Canada's Immigration Records > Sponsored Emigration

Sponsored emigration refers to emigration schemes that were funded by a government or a company. These schemes would involve a migration of a group of people, usually from Great Britain, to Canada in order to fulfill a need.

Some well-known emigration schemes include:

Filles du roi, 1663-1673. Sponsored by King Louis XIV of France, nearly 800 unmarried young women were sent to New France to help boost the population.

United Empire Loyalists, 1783-1800s. Transportation costs to Canada were covered by Britain for any person living in the newly created United States of America who remained loyal to the British crown during/after the American Revolutionary War.

Peter Robinson Settlers, 1823 & 1825. Migrated from County Cork, Ireland to Lanark County, Upper Canada (Ontario) in 1823, and Peterborough County, Upper Canada in 1825.

British immigrant children from Dr. Barnardo's Homes at landing stage, Saint John, N.B.  Credit: Isaac Erb/Library and Archives Canada/PA-041785 British immigrant children from Dr. Barnardo's Homes at landing stage, Saint John, N.B. Credit: Isaac Erb/Library and Archives Canada/PA-041785

Petworth Emigration Scheme, 1830s.  1,800 immigrants from Petworth in West Sussex, England to Upper Canada.

Home Children, 1869-1930s. Approximately 100,000 children aged 4-16 were sent from the U.K. to Canada to be adopted or to work as indentured servants.

Doukhobors, 1899-1914. 7,500 Doukhobors emigrated from Russia.